Skip to main content

Full text of "Annual report of the Division of Immigration and Americanization"

See other formats


BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofdi1958mass 




.,,-■■■ 






'•' iff 





' 3 




-"a' j ' - 




38fr 



KtJf 



tfl#S3KfivnaAoj Mb 



ANNUAL REPORT ■ 
Year Ending June 30, 1958 
of the 
DIVISION OF MIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 

of the 
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

On June 30, 1958, the Division of Immigration and Americanization completed 
thirty-nine years as a part of the Department of Education* Since the Division is' 
the successor to the Bureau of Immigration created by act of Legislature on May 25, 
1917, the State work for the foreign born is forty-one years old* 

The bZ 9 6I4.7 services rendered clients during the past year showed an increase 
of 1,095 over last year. The increases were noted in the District Offices, except 
for Springfield where the District Agent had to work alone a great part of' the 
year due to the illness' of the Secretary in that office© Boston listed 26,159' 
services; Fall River, 3,911; Lawrence, 3, 2$k? Springfield, 3,9^0 and YiTorcester, 
5,383. 

In January 1958, under the Alien Registration Act, 1J0,038 aliens registered 
in the Commonwealth, an increase of nearly 600 over the preceding year. Massachu- 
setts' ranks 7th in number of aliens in the United States of which there are 
2,899,691« New York has the greatest number with 558, U62 followed by California, 
Texas, Illinois, Michigan and New Jersey. The nationalities of aliens registered 
in 1958 in Massachusetts are: 

Great Britain & Canada . ho ,333 

Italy 16,833 

Polish 11,962 

Germany. •••••.... 5,738 

USSR il,6U2 

Greece • •••• * . , .. . .... It,l52 

Chinese., 1,292 

All Others Ii5,086 

The Annual Report of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service Listed 11,260 
aliens destined to Massachusetts for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1957» Statis- 
tics show that of the aliens coming to this State, Canada leads in number with those 
from Italy next, closely followed by those from the United Kingdom and then Germany, 
etc. We have about 1100 Hungarian Parolees in this State, We note among our 
clientele quite a number of Polish born persons who came to join their relatives 
in this state and many instances of families being reunited after long separations a 

NATIONALITIES AND LOCALITIES OF CLIBKTo 

Of the fifty-five nationalities served, the Italian born clients, although 
many of them naturalized citizens, were largest in number of which there were 
8,U86. United States born persons are next in number with 5?565 with Canadians, 
i+,U29; followed by Irish born and closely followed by Polish and Portuguese born 
clients with each near 2,700, with clients born in Germany, France and Great Britain 
next in number, with clients from practically every city or tovm. in the Common- 

- 1 - 



t , .1 



- 



' 



I 



- 



wealth, since our offices are so located to cover the State. 

WELCOMING THE NEWCOMER 

Ihis Division continues to send welcome letters to persons destined to this 
State from abroad. 'Jhe letter of welcome informs the newcomer of the services of 
the offices to help him in becoming assimilated to life in the United States. 
Many of the replies request information about schools and educational opportunities, 
as well as information on citizenship and reunion of relatives to come. In the 
past year it was noted that job opportunities for the newcomer were not as plenti- 
ful. Inquiries about employment opportunities were referred to proper sources. 
Our offices had personal contact with some 2,1;71 newcomers in the past year for 
various types of assistance. 

MIGRATION LEGISLATION OF 1957 

Enactment of new legislation affects our work with aliens so that our immi- 
gration work with the clients was increased due especially to the enactment of 
Public Law 8£-3l6 on September 11, 1957 • This law made many important changes in 
the Immigration Statutes. Notable in this legislation was the granting of legi- 
timate status to children born out of wedlocks Previously this child could not 
get a preferential quota status and in countries where there was a backlog of 
registrations such a child registered in the nonpreference category faced a wait 
of many years. Now the law permits the mother of such a child to petition and 
grants the child nonquota status if under twenty-one years of age if the mother is 
a citizen, or preferential status in the third preference category if she is an 
alien. Several mothers have been united with their children since the enactment 
of this law. The law also grants nonquota status to legally adopted children 
under fourteen years of age if the child has been in the legal custody of the 
parents for two years. This law affected several of our recently arrived families 
from Italy in which cases the child had been legally adopted abroad, had been in 
their legal custody and the foster parents had been able to come to the United 
States under the Refugee Act but were not permitted to bring their adopted child 
with them. In one of our cases, such a child had been registered on the quota 
since 19^0 and only the enactment of this legislation reunited thu family. 

This law permits to come to the United States through June 30, 1959 orphans 
or adopted children under fourteen years of age« In some countries, adoption is 
possible abroad by power of attorney, etc* We assisted in making further documents, 
affidavits of support, etc., in cases where Greek children had been adopted abroad 
and several youngsters are happy in their new homes in the United States. 

Another feature of the law permits relatives^ even though they had been certi- 
fied to have tuberculosis, to join their parents and spouses 3 We had several cases 
where the wife had come to the United States with children but had to leave the 
husband behind because he had been unable to comply with the health regulations. 
The law permits the granting of a waiver of requirements in such c ses, provided 
arrangements are made for the alien to enter, immediately after arrival, some 
approved hospital for medical treatment. In a number of these cases, after admis- 
sion to the hospital and short treatment, the relative was released as not requiring 
further hospitalization. 



Also, the Attorney General has been given discretionary powers in granting a 
waiver of the requirements in certain arrest records. This helped in cases whore 
the alien abroad had been found guilty on several occasions of offenses considered 
having moral turpitude. One case in question was that of a wife of a returning 
GI. During the war she had been found guilty on several occasions of theft . 
Further investigation showed that the thefts had 'involved a pair of gloves and in 
another instance a pair of shoes from a roommate * This pair was reunited under the 
law, 

This law also permits adjustment in cases of applicants who had entered the 
United States alleging that they were of some nationality other than that of their 
birth. The law provides that such persons can become naturalized if they can 
establish to the satisfaction of the United States Attorney General that such 
allegations were made because of fear of return to Russia. This affected a number 
of our clients who had been born in Russia and claimed Polish birth because in 
Germany where they were Displaced Persons they feared repatriation to the country 
of their birth and escape. Two such clients have already been naturalized. 

Aliens classified in the first preference category, those with skills urgently 
needed in the United States, if their petitions were approved before July 1, 1957, 
were granted nonquota status. We assisted in 3<?£ change of status cases, a good 
number of them in this special skilled category. In cases where the aliens had 
been born in such countries as China, Spain, India where there was a wait in the 
quota, the situation is eased now by permission to adjust their status without 
going to Canada under "preexamination privileges" . 

This law also permits some 18,656 refugees to come from countries due to fear 
of persecution on account of political or religious belief and who have fled from 
Communist controlled countries. Wo are continuing in making affidavits of support 
and cooperating with agencies concerned. 

Most notable of all in the lav/ was the removal of mortgages on quotas which 
were established because of the Displaced Persons Act of 19U8 and 19^0 . The remov- 
al of such mortgages made the quotas from such countries as Poland, Latvia, 
Lithuania, Czechoslovakia and Russia larger so that it was noted that preferential 
category quota relatives no longer had to wait long periods for their turns in the 
quota. In fact, for the first time in many years, the Czechoslovak and Russian 
quotas in the nonpreference category are currently available. 

CITIZENSHIP RULINGS 

In the laws of citizenship, an important decision was rendered by the Supreme 
Court which affected American born persons who had military service in foreign 
countries. Many .American born citizens living abroad since childhood had been 
compelled to serve the countries of their residence. Formerly they were ruled to 
have lost their citizenship by such military service unless a protest was filed at 
the time of their induction and was on record, Several of our applicants had the 
cases of their relatives reviewed and we have noted the arrival into the United 
States as citizens of two such persons. The law of Derivative Citizenship has also 
been amended so that under certain conditions a child who was formerly required to 
come to the United States before the age of sixteen in order to derive United States 
citizenship can now come to the United States as late as his twenty- third birthday. 



NEWEST IMMIGRATION LEGISLATION 

Newest legislation effective after July 1, 1958 permitting adjustment of 
status for Hungarians in the United States from Parolee to permanent residents 
after completion of two years residence, and the change in the law allowing persons 
to have their arrival registered in the United States by proving residence only 
since I9I4O instead of 1921;, will create more work, 

CITIZENSHIP 

Citizenship applicants were fewer than last year* £,5U8 persons were naturali- 
zed in this state in the past year. We circularized a letter of offer of assis- 
tance to about 1000 applicants who had previously applied for naturalization and 
either had failed in examinations or had postponed further action. The response 
?vas about 2$% requesting such assistance. Many had moved and left no forwarding 
address. Our offices filled 2,£U8 applications for naturalization. We completed 
67I1 applications to obtain Certificates of Citizenship for persons who had derived 
citizenship either through their parents or through marriage. We gave to each 
applicant for citizenship our booklet to help him prepare for naturalization 
examination. Most of the persons applying for naturalization are comparatively of 
newcomer category, that is, those who came to the United States since about 19U8 # 
Those whom we find need assistance in being able to comply with the requirements 
are referred to schools where classes in citizenship are held. 

This being election year, many persons who derive citizenship and who have 
moved from one city to another faced new registration and it is usually necessary 
in such cases for the persons to apply for certificates of citizenship in order 
to register to vote. 

Although "first papers" are no longer required, our offices filled 288 such 
applications last year because applicants needed this Declaration of intention 
either to go into the Army, to join unions, to become Registered Nurses or to take 
the Medical Board examinations. 



COOPERATION WITH OTHER AGENCIES 

Tne Division cooperates with social agencies, public and private. We have 
referrals from the Division of Public Welfare, Registrar of Voters and Social 
Security offices, as well as other State offices to give special technical informa- 
tion on citizenship and immigration problems. We have many contacts with the 
various sponsoring agencies working with refugees and our relations have been most 
cooperative and mutually helpful. Close contact and constant cooperative relation- 
ship with the Adult Civic Education Groups of the Commonwealth are maintained and, 
as a member of the Committee for the Foreign B rn of the United Community Services, 
we participate in meetings and problems of the foreign born, Relations with the 
Federal Immigration and Naturalization Service continue with cooperation and assis- 
tance • 

The increasing numbers of calls for our services in our offices without publi- 
city or advertising of our work point out how successful have been the efforts of 



the Division of Immigration and Americanization in fulfilling its duties as designa- 
ted in the law establishing this Division, which are as follows: 

"The Division of Immigration and Americanization 
shall employ such methods, consistent with law, 
as in its judgment will tend to bring into 
sympathetic and mutually helpful relations the 
Conmonwealth and its residents of foreign origin, 
protect immigrants from exploitation and abuse, 
stimulate their acquisition and mastery of 
English, develop their understanding of American 
government, institutions and ideals and generally 
promote their assimilation and naturalization." 

FALL RIVER OFFICE 

At the closing of the fiscal year en June 30, 1958, our records show that a 
total of 3 > 911 persons requested advice and assistance in problems dealing with 
citizenship, immigration and other services © 

Clients from thirty-five different localities called at this office for some 
type of service and constituted a nationality makeup of forty-three different 
nationalities* An increase of 3&k services were rendered over the previous fiscal 
year which shows that citizenship and immigration problems are on the increase in 
this District due to the closing of the United States Immigration and Naturalization 
Service office in New Bedford, Massachusetts. 

Citizenship information and Immigration information again led the field. A 
total of 300 petitions for naturalization were completed with 72 applications for 
certificates of citizenship, A total of 21)4 immigration applications were completed 
and forwarded to "the Immigration and Naturalization Service at Boston, Massachusetts 
for adjudication, A total of l£l Affidavits of Support were completed as required 
by the American Consuls abroad in the issuing of immigration visas to clients. 

Change of status in this locality amounted to a total of 18, in these cases 
a good deal of work is required. 

As usual, Fall River leads the list in clients with New Bedford running a 
close second. It must be noted that this agent visits New Bedford only one day a 
week and a heavy workload is anticipated and handled each and every week© It must 
be further noted that 1,22£ services were rendered to clients in New Bedford and 
this excludes the greater New Bedford area which would bring the total to a greater 
amount. 

This office has worked in close alliance with the Family Service Units in Fall 
River and New Bedford 5 Public Welfare Departments and Adult Education Classes in 
both cities. 

On June 12, 1958, this Agent was a speaker at the closing exercises of the 
Adult Education Classes, bringing greetings from the Division of Immigration and 
Americanization. 

- 5 - 



On March 26, 1958, he was speaker before the Education Committee of the First 
Unitarian Church at New Bedford, Massachusetts* 

For the past fiscal year, the Fall River Office can look with pride in its 
program of sympathetic and mutually helpful assistance to the Commonwealth and its 
residents of foreign origin in this area* 

LAWRENCE OFFICE 

The Lawrence Office statistics for this fiscal year reached the figure of 
3,2514 services, an increase over the 1957 fiscal year of 389, and U6£ over 1956* 
Efforts were made by the agent in the direction of public relations, and for an 
increase in services in this area* In each and every instance , the contact brought 
an increased interest in the Division. This agent took over the work of this 
office on February 1, 1958 on the retirement of the former agent, 

Ihe attendance of the agent at the Superior Court, Lawrence, naturalization 
sessions March 7 and June 12, marked the initial contact, The agent was also invit- 
ed as Principal Speaker at the graduation exercises of evening school attendants, at 
the Lawrence High School, April 2nd, This included the Adult Alien groups attend- 
evening classes. On April 10th she attended the Massachusetts Conference on Social 
Work in Bedford, A visit to Lowell to render immigration and citizenship service to 
those residents was made by the agent on May 21st,' Attendance of the Dinner- 
Meeting at the International Institute on May 28th, as Board Member, was made by the 
agent, June 3rd marked the luncheon of the Greater Lawrence Social Agencies held 
at Merrimack College, North Andover© 

Ihe personal appearance of the agent at the naturalization session afforded an 
opportunity to meet with the court personnel and the patriotic groups such as the 
D,A.R, and the American Legion representatives meeting the new citizens, as well as 
the Judge, and the persons whom the Division assisted, 

Ihe appointment of the agent as Board Member of the local International Insti- 
tute meant working in closer cooperation with the Executive Director and the immi- 
gration problems of the organization were referred here, Hungarians in particular 
sought information as to how to get their relatives here from abroad. In some 
instances, they sought information as to how to enter the Army, r Jheir "parole 
status" limited their benefits and opportunities. No doubt the new legislation, 
Public Law 85-559 of July 25, 1958 will help this group to adjust their parole 
status, so that they may share in the benefits of other resident aliens. 

Attending the luncheon of Greater Lawrence Social Agencies at Merrimack College 
and the Massachusetts Conference of Social Work at Bedford, was helpful as the agent 
participated with other agencies 5 local and out-of-town, in a community effort in 
handling problems of the public. Meeting department and organization heads also 
resulted in some referrals to this Division, 

Thirteen change of status cases have been initiated since the agent's arrival 
here, February 1st, Of the thirteen, five have been completed and eight are pend- 
ing, A great deal of telephone calls for United States passport information and 
international travel vaccination requirements prompted the agent to restore the 
United States application service which had somehow fallen into decline. Forms for 

- 6 - 



United States passports were obtained and other pertinent booklets and data for 
information* The passport agency of Boston has been most cooperative. 

This Service, however small, is rewarding in that it promotes good public 
relations by word of mouth. Many travel agents and lawyers call on the Division for 
information and make referrals wherever possible. 

Naturalization is not an over-active service. Greater Lawrence, (includes 
Andover, North Andover, Methuen), has about 3000 aliens ; naturalization at the 
Superior Court, "Lawrence reaches the figure of about 200 per year, having four 
sessions a year* Ihis includes persons from Greater' Lawrence, Haverhill and a few 
other small towns of Essex County. Salem, of course, has its naturalization sessions 
also. Our office completed 108 applications for naturalization last year. 

The Division enjoys the closest relations and cooperation with the nearby- 
educational and religious institutions of all denominations and hospitals, as well 
as patriotic organizations, such as the D.A.R. and the American Legion, the Police 
Departments, libraries, church and civic groups. The work of the Division is well 
known and those who had assistance come back again. 

SPRINGFIELD OFFICE 

During the past fiscal year 3,9^0 persons were recorded as having received 
services at the Springfield Office, 

Of this number, 82$ were personally handled by the District Agent. During 
the last six months of the year the District Agent was called upon to perform all of 
the duties necessary to maintain the office, !Ihis was due to the resignation of the 
Clerk-Stenographer and the difficulty in trying to obtain a replacement. 

Ihe statistics show that people came to us from k9 communities in the four 
Western Counties of Massachusetts. We had contact with hi former residents of the 
State residing in other parts of the country, 

More than hp nationalities were recorded during the past year. Native born 
citizens headed the list with citizens of Canada, Italy, Poland, Great Britain, 
Germany, Ireland and Greece making up the list of major nationalities. 

Letters of Welcome were sent to 295> immigrants who entered the United States 
during the year destined to this area. 

Although applications to become citizens were fewer this year, we devoted a 
great deal of time rendering decisions on the citizenship status of individuals. 
Many of these requests camo to us from the Recruiting Office of the various branches 
of our Armed Forces j from industries, in connection with security checks of their 
employees. 

With- frequent .assignment of Air Force Personnel of S.A.C. at W G stovor Air 
Force Base, we handled many cases of prompt naturalization of the wives of these men 
who wished to accompany their hushands overseas 






Once again Immigration topped the list of services given to applicants who 
wished to sponsor relatives coming to the United States to live, to visit and others 
to adjust their status . 

Because of the recession, we had many residents, citizens of Canada and Ireland, 
who came to us for advice about adjusting their problems created by unemployment. 
Most of them sought information about returning to their homeland and to remain until 
the employment conditions were improved* All of them stated that they did not wish 
to become a burden to relatives, their sponsors or the communities where they lived© 

Again this past year we handled a case of a gentleman from Czechoslovakia, 
assisting him to adjust his status to that of a permanent resident under procxamina- 
tion. He is one of those who escaped from Germany in a home-made tank. He 'was sent 
to the United States as a visitor with the aid of the "Crusade for Freedom"* 

Near the close of the year, the Chairman, Members of the Board and the 
Supervisor of the Division made a visit to the Springfield Office to check the 
quarters we now occupy and to look over the proposed sight of the "Little State 
House" at Springfield, which is to house all State Offices* 

WORCESTER OFFICE 

The fiscal year 1958 closed with the Worcester Office recording 5,383 services 
to clients* This is an increase of 1,297 services over the previous year's total of 
U,086, This is the first year of work for this agent in this office. 

During the year, this office assisted individuals representing over lfl nation- 
alities residing in 63 conxriunities throughout the .Commonwealth. 

Answering inquiries pertaining to imigration headed the list of services 
rendered, while information regarding citizenship was the second most frequent 
service given. It is interesting to note that the boom in tourist travel in 1957-58 
was reflected in this office by a marked increase in requests for travel information. 

Of the nationalities served, Italy was the country most frequently represented, 
followed by Canadian born individuals. Native born Americans and persons born in 
Poland came to us in about equal nunbers* Ireland, Germany, Great Britain, Lithuania 
and Syria and Lebanon were also well represented. 

In reference to the localities served, fQ% of our clients during the year were 
residents of Worcester. 

During the last three months of the fiscal year, this office experimented in- 
publicizing the benefits to be derived from naturalization via the local newspaper, 
the radio and through individually written letters. Our efforts were rewarded by an 
awakened interest in citizenship on the part of many aliens in this area. 

We have continued to maintain good relations with the various local, state 
and federal agencies, as well as with the several voluntary agencies, institutions 
and schools in this area. 



- 8 - 



Beside supplying information, filling forms, conducting correspondence, inter- 
preting and making translations in matters pertaining to immigration, citizenship and 
travel, this office performed a variety of other functions during the year ending 
June 30, 1958, 

Approximately 275 letters o£ welcome were sent to newly arrived immigrants in 
this area. 

We contacted all the supervisors and teachers in citizenship and Adult Educa- 
tion in Worcester and in the surrounding towns, offering our assistance in all 
matters pertaining to immigration and naturalization. 

Many newly arrived immigrants were 'assisted by this office in finding employ- 
ment by referrals to appropriate sources. 

During the year, this Agent attended Ccmmunity Chest meetings, talked on 
jimmigration before a church group - in Hillbury, Massachusetts and gave a talk to the 
citizenship class in Gilbertville, Massachusetts, 

We have 'counselled many new arrivals to this country regarding educational 
opportunities, employment possibilities, recreational facilities and have discussed 
their personal problems with them, thus affording them an opportunity to adjust more 
rapidly to their new environment and to the American way of living, 



- o « 



Statistical Detail 
Services Given 



For the Fiscal Year 7/1/57 - 6/30/58 



All Offices 



I. 





^ 




a 






| 


o 


H 


1 


s 


ft! 


ts; 


S 


CO 


CO 


d 


1 


H 


8 
0* 


o 


£ 


a 


CO 


g 



EH 

O 
En 



INFORM TIOW 



It Booklets, forms, blanks ^ 1,1*1*8 j 

2. Citizenship I 755 ' 

3 • Immigration 1 6 3 lh£~\ 

1*. Trave l j 79 I 

5. Other 



8,821+ j 1,922 lljjtgg 2jh2k 3 3 23k j 17,899 



II. FORMS FILLED 



N-10£ 

N-300[ 
N-l*Oo[ 
N-600_ 

N-585 



6. 
7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12, 

13. 

111. Other Snmig. Forms 

15. AR-11 ; 

16. I~9Q 

17. AR-53 oF~%H 



37 



163 



1*72 



16 



Other Natur. Forms 

1-131 [ 

1-133 



237 



III. EXECUTION OF AFFIDAVITS 



18. Affidavit of support 

19. Affidavit of facts 

20. Other Notarial 

21. Assurances 



117 



651* 



289 



30l* 



529 



2,1*80 

5" 



IV, OfflER SERVICES 



22, Change of Status_ 

23. Appearance at hearings 



291+ 



208 



21*. Interpretation & Trans . j 786 [ 

25. Letters | 6.0UU j 

26. Other j 3q j 



V. INTERVIEW 



h&* i 



27. Newcomer Interview 

28. Refugee Interview 



39 



279 

"o^O" 



172 

W 



581 
Wo 



261 



2,71*1 



560 : 71U 



830 



72 



97 



278 






3^570 



"B71 



39^ I 161 



69 



& 



o 



122 



803 



5,1-1-72 I 796 1 J3k 



512 



785 



8,299 



60 



11 



1*0 



228 



1,736 , 3 00 \ 108 



166 



238 



2,51*8 



72 



3k 



i»8 



w 



6714 



16 



27 



31 



31 



w 



37)4 



1* 



75 



IT 



12 

IF 



22 



156 



57 



861 



918 139 lOU 



w 



90 



1,291 



22 



1*3 



ik 



26 



10. 



J& 



Ml 



27 



99 



"W 



71 



1*1* 



1,162 



2,976 1 1475 i 327 i 36k \ 567 



Mo? 



151 iia 



125 



28I4 



3,181 



19. 



28 



13 



J488 305 157 



226 



12. 



261* 



3L 



1,1+14.0 



1 



7,362 : ; 531* j j 592 ; 173 



608 



9,269 



18 



20 



Hi 



16 



362 



JlII 



5 



ii 



— L 



21U 



126 ' 1.0 00 



1*67 i f 379 j 1*9 j U*3 ; 7 , 10 2 



. UP. i 
181* 



109 



22 



201 



106 



1*67 



I89 



2,1*71 



1,1*86 : 181; j 106 



1*66 



187 



2,1*29 



1*2 



26,159 1,3,911 ; 3,251* j 3,91*0 j 5,383 i 1*2,61*7 



fiscal Year 7/1/57 - 6/30/$Q 



All Offices 



Nationality and Ethnic Statistics 



FALL 



SPRING- 



BOS TON RIVER LAWRENCE FIEID WORCESTER TOTAL 




Albania 

Africa^ 

Arme nia (R. or T # ) 

Australia 

Austria 

Belgiun__ 

Bulgaria 

Canada 

Central America 

China 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Egypt_ 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Great Br: 

Greece 

Hungary 

Iceland' 

India 

Indonei 

Iran 

Iraq_ 

Ireland 

Israel 

Italy 

Japan 

Jordan 

Korea 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Mexico 

Netherlands 

New Zealand 

Norway 

Pakistan 

Palestine 

Philippines 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

South America 

Spain_ 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Syria & Lebano n 217 

Turkey (Not Armenia; 351 

Triest e = ^J 

Ukraine 

u\S.SJt7_ 

United State; 

West Indies 

Yugoslavia 

Other Countries "XoTJ 

"2^T3Tl3 



26U 
U2 9 bhl 



Fiscal Year 7/1/57 - 6/30/58 



LOCALI TIES 



All Offices 



Abington_ 
Acton 



Boston 



Fall 
River i 



Lawrence 



Spring- 
field I Yiforcester 



T 



15 



— 



TT 



T A L 

~ T3T 



11 



Acushnet 

Adams " 

Agawam 



31 



31 

¥ 



7^ 



7T 



p 



Amesbury 
.Amherst 



To" 



13 I 



TG 



1 1 



12 



TF 



"me 



Ahdover 
Arlington^ 

Ashby ] 

Ashland 

Athol 



"5* 



1W 



1ST 



1ST 



13 



35" 



Attleboro 

Auburn " 

Avon 

Ayer 



16 



17 



W 



m 



T7B* 



Barnstable 
Bar re 



THT 



TT" 



HT 



19 



TT 



T* 



nr 



T5" 



Bedford 

Belcher town 
Bellingham_J 

Belmont 

Berlin * 



62 



T 



67 



Sa 



13F1 



i 
"IT 



"23T 



"5T 



Beverly 

Billerica 
Blackstone 

Bolton " 

Boston 

Bourne"" 



W 



W 



17 



13 



¥ 



11,21+0 



"137177 



10 



TPT 



22 



2F 



Boxford" 
Boylston 



3 



JiO. 



10 



10 



W 



Brain tree 

Bridgewater 

Brmfield 

Brockton 

Brookfield_ 
Brookline 
Burlington 
Cambridge 

Canton 

Charlton 

Chatham 



m 



-TT 



210 



wrr 



— r 



3F 



1,870 """TT 



90 



"52T 



"2I3T 

¥ 



"557 



37 



T7BBT 



90 



IT 
"6-T 



10 



CheJmsford 


10 




6 1 


- 


- 1 


16 


Chelsea 


275 


- ' 


22 I 


"* 


- 


297 


Cheshire 






- i 


— 


1 

- 


1 


Chicopee 


5 




■M 


h$9 




U6U 


Clinton 


11 


"* 


«"» j 


- 


67 


7b 


Cohasset 


9 




- i 


- 


- 


9 


Concord 


32 


- 


"* i 






32 


Conway 


- 




z 1 , 


2 


m 


2 



- 1 - 



Danvers 

Dartmouth 
Dedham 



Deerfield^ 

Dighton [ 

Douglas 

Dover 

Dracu ^ 

Dudley 

Duxbury 



East Longneadow_ 

Easthampton 

Eas ton 

Essex 

Everett 



Fairhaven__ 
Fall River_ 
Falmouth 



Fitchburg 

FoxborouglT 

Framingham" 

Frankli n 

Freetown 

Gardner 



Georgetown 
Gloucester" 

Goshen " 

Gosnol T 

Grafton 

Granby " 



Great Barring ton 

Gr e e nf ie Id " 

Grot on 

G rove land 

Hadley 



Halifax^ 
Hamilton 
H ampdenj 
Hanover_ 
Hanson " 



Hardwick__ 
Harvard 

Harwich 

Hatfield__ 

Haverhill 

Hingham 

Holbrook__ 

Holden 



HollanH 

Holliston 

Holyoke 



Hope dale 
Hopkinton 



Boston 

2F 



Fall 
River 



i Lawrence 

1 3T 



W 



I06T 

=3 



nr 



4- 



TF 



T 



IT 



1BT 



7 T3E 



"20TT7923 

33 30" 



m 



"8" 



T3BT 



I 



"SH" 



T 



in 



2 

TOT' 



th 



*~4- 



21 



TOT 



FT 



121 



13 



T27 



T« 



irr 






TT 



"7t 



l' 



Spring- 

Xield i Worcester 



zri 



r 






1 = — !" 



-i 



3 
T 



33F 



r-t 






- r 



T 



1 — r 



~2W 



11 



T o 



3U 



F 



3H" 



39 



11 



W 



t a 

35~ 



97 



106 
1 
"IT 

~T 

"TF 

"TT 



2 

■ar 

TT 



- 8 



'121 

1^53 



6T 



"TF 
lHo" 



73 

T 



"IDT 
3 



1 



T 



IT 

F 



io_ 

9 

"T 



12 

"T 



13 



11 
TT 



T 

TT 



18T 



TIT 



to 
T 



~TTT 
"26T 



- 2 - 



Hubbardston 

Hudson " 

Hull 

Ipswich 



Boston 



Fall 
River 



Lawrence 



Spring- 
field - Worcester 



TOTAL 



WT 



IF 
17 



T 



3 




U2 



T 



Kingston 
Lake vi lie 
Lancaster 
Lawrence 
Lee 



"18" 



in 



20 



"55" 



1,373 



Tf 



"2T 



37 



TTHsr 



Leicester 
Lenox 



58^ 



60 



T 



Leominster 
Lexington " 
Lincoln 



37 



105 



IF 



11 



ToF 



IF 



Littleton 
Longneadow" 

Lowell " 

Ludlow 



TIT 



T 



w 






T& 



nr 






137] 



W 



Lunenburg 

Lynn " 

Lynnfield 



2 

W 



10 



2 



Needham 

New AshforcP 
New Bedford 
; New Marlboro 
Newbury 



13 






W 



hi 11,225 '! 



- * 



r_i 



13 



Maiden 


377 






! ~* i 


- 


377 


Manchester 


7 






- i 


- 


7 


Mansfield 


19 


2 


- 




. 


21 


Marblehead' 


20 


•- 


6 


"* i 


..., _i_ 


26 


Marion 


6 


. ,. ... 




_ | 


- 


6 


Marlboro 


32 


- 


- 


_ i 


15 


U7 


Marsh fie I'd 


Uh 


- 


- 


. ,4 

- 




fall 


Mattapoisett 


- 


1 


- 






1 


Maynard 


30 


~» 


■"" 


- i 


1 
* — 


30 


Medfield 


20 






1 ! 


- - ' 


20 


Medford 


550 


- 


1 


m j 


- 


551 


Medway 


20 




1 


■" s 


- 


20 


Melrose" 


91 


- 


- 


- i 


- 


91 


Merrimac 


1 




2 


"" 5 


- 


3 


Methuen 


11 


,„ *" 


£85 


"-' ! ' 


- 


596 


Middleboro 


21 


mm 


am 




- 


21 


Middle ton 


1 - 


- 


9 


~ 1 " 

_. 5 


- 


10 


Milford 


5b 1 


2 




1 


38 


9tf 


Miilbury 


5 i 


- 


™ 




\6 


5^ 


Millis 


2 ! 


- 


- 1 


- j 


- 


2 


Millville 


i ! 




- 


" i 


- 


1 


Milton 


90 J 






™ j 


- 


90 


Monson 


__ i 




, j 


7 ! 


- 


7 


Montague 


2 1 


- 


i 


5 1 


1 


b 


Nan ant 


15 i 


- 






- 


15 


Nantucket 


5 1 


- 


- | 


•*• l 


- 


3 

2 


Natick 


133 


— 






_ 


133 



w 



1^272 



1 



- 3 





Boston i 


Fall 
River 


Lawrence 


Spring- 
field 


Worcester i 


TOTAL 


Newburyport 


26 j 


- 


16 


- 


— ] 


U2 


Newton 


7251 


- 


- 


M 




725 


Norfolk 


51 


. 


- 


- 




T 


North Adans 


»l 


- 


- 


9 


E 


17 


North Andover 


Y| 


- 


163 


- 


1 


170 


North Attleboro 


3! 


Z 


- 




! - l 


5 


North Brookfield 


-! 


"" i 


- 




h \ 


ft 


North Reading 


25 1 






"* 


- 


25 


Northampton 


261 


•* 


- 


5U 


- 


50 


Northboro 


10! 


"" i 


- 


- 


6 I 


16 


Northbridge 


2] 


"""T 




- 


5» I 


60 


Northfield 


1! 


- i 


- 


- 


"" 


1 


Norton 




6 1 


- 






6 


Norwell 


2i 




- 


- 




2 


Norwood 


105 ! 


j 


- 


MM 




10b 


Oak Bluffs 


3"! 


i 


- 


mm 




3 


Orange 


2 1 


i 


mmt 


1 


_ 


3 


Orleans 


u\ 


- 


- 


- 


| ' 


ft 


Oxford 


li 


- 


- 




17 


lb 


Palmer 


III 


- 


- 


29 


i 


33 


Paxton 


2 i 


- 


- 




a 


10 


Peabody 


191 i 


- 


1 


- 


— 


192 


Pembroke 


2; 


_ 


- 


_ 


l 


2 


Pepperell 


5: 










5 


Petersham 


lj 




- 


"" 


2 


3 


Pitts fie Id 


37 1 


- 


- 


29 


! i 


i 67 


Plainville 


21 


- 






- 


2 


Plymouth 


55 


- 


- 


" 


- 


! 55 


Princeton 


- 


- 


- 




2 


1 2 


Provincetbwh 


10 


3 


- 


- 


- 


1 13 


Quincy 


5UU 


2 


- 






1 5U6 


Randolph 


62 










i 62 


Raynham 




5 


- 




— , — . .. _j 


1 5 


Reading 


33 




11 


- 




i /^ 


Rehoboth 


I 


5 


- 






| 6 


Revere 


265 


. 


3 


i 


- 


269 


Rochester 


1 


1 






- 


\ 2 


Rockland 


U6 


r ~~' 


- 


- 


- 


h6 


Rockport 


U 




- 


- 


~ 


1 a 


Rowley 


u 


- 


- 


- 


- 


i ft 


Royals ton 


2 


- 






2 


! ft 


Rutland 


- 


- 


■■ 


mm ~ 


16 


16 


Salem 


«5 




3 




- 


1 tib 1 


Salisbury 


- 




12 




- 


1 12 


Sandwich 


5 


- 


- 




- 


1 5 


Saugus 


66 


mm 






- 


1 66 


Scituate 


UU 


- 






- 


ftft 


Seekonk 


2 


ia 




- 


- 


20 


Sharon 


m 


- 




- 1 


- 


Ub 


Shelburne 


5 




- 


1 


1 


2 


Sherborn 




- 


- 


- 


B 


Shirley 


21 




- 




«* 


21 



- ll- 





Fall 
Boston River 


Lawrence 


Spring- 
field 


'Worcester 


TO T A L 


Shrewsbury 


7! - I 


** i 




161 


16b 


Somerset 


' 2 ! 8£ 1 








' b7 


Scmerville 


1,U26 j 


i 




: 


1,4^6 


South Hadlcy 


-. 1 


- \ 


3« 


: 


38 


Southampton 


m, | — 


j 


1 




1 


Southboro 


o| 






9 ! 


15 


Southbridge 


26 ! 


. i 


2 1 


73 i 


101 


Southwick 


1 

i 


- 


19 1 




19' 


Spencer 


i! 


- 




15 


• 16 


Springfield! 


W i 


- 


2,363 ! 




2 5 ull 


Sterling 


- 


- 


wm 


3 ! 


3 


Stockbridge 


I ! 


mm 


- 




1 


Stoneham 


id | 


- 


- 


- 


lb 


Stoughtoh 


37 ! 


- 




- 


37 


Stow 


3! - ! 


- 






3 


Sudbury 


15 j - 


- 






15 


Sutton 




*taa 




2U 


24 


Swamps cott 


30 ! 


- 




- 


30 


Swansea 


- 1 70 




- 


- 


76 


Taunton 


3U 1 110 


mm 


_ 


- 


lUi 


Temple ton 


3 i 


- 


-• "■ 


1 


4 


Tewksbury 


10 


15 






25 


Tisbury 


3 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Topsfield 


i ! 


- 






1 


Townsend 


1 1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


lyngsboro 


3 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Upton 


- } 


- 


- 


7 


1 7 


Uxbridge 


2 1 


- 


1 


26 


29 


Wakefield 


5b 1 - 


- 


- 


- 


! 5b 


Walpole 


64 1 






- 


I 6U 


Waltham 


422 ] 


- 


1 


- 


! U23 


Ware 


1 ! 




,_. — 


3 


! ii 


Ware ham 


6 1 17 


- 






23 


Warren 


- 1 


- 


h 


6 


10 


Water town 


505 i 


- 




- 


W$ 


Wayland 


17 


- 


- 


- 


17 


Webs ter 


8 1 


- 


- 


| kl 


! 49 


We lies ley 


105 


- 


- 


- 


105 


Wellfleet 


1 3 


- 


- 


- 


U 


Wenham 


3 1 * 


- 


- 


- 


3 


West Boylston 


2 ! 


- 




53 


! 55 


West Bridgeware']? 


2 


- 


- 


- 


! 2 


West Newbury 


- 


5 




- 


1 5 


West Springfield 


- 


- 


ioU 


- 


! loii 


Westboro 


9 1 - 






19 


1 2b 


Westfield 


2 




67 


- 


1 69 


Westford 


10 


- 




j , 


10 


Westminster 


1 




- 




1 


Weston 


"30 ! 




- 


1 


31 


Westport 


- 1 lib 


- 


- 


- 


! Ub 


Westwood 


2b ■ 


i ~" 


- 


- 


i 26 


Weymouth 


109 


J 


- 


- 


109 



-s- 



Fall 
Boston ! River I Lawrence 



Spring- 
field i Worcester 



TO T A L 



Whitman 


2k 




- 




- 


2U 


Wilbraham 


3 


- 


- 


20 I 


- 


23 


Williams town 





- 


- 


6 1 




Ul 


Wilmington 


12 


- 




J 


- 


12 


Winchendon 


- 


- 


- 


2 : 


2 


U 


Winchester 


52 


- 


IM|"" 


- 


«HB 


52 


Winthrop 


09 


- 




- 


- 


09 


Woborn 


110 




" 


- 


- 


'110 


Worcester 


163 


U 


l 


1 


U,21B j 


U,3b7 


Worthing ton 


- 


- 


- 


1 j 




1 


Wrentham 


T 


- 






1 


5 


Yarmouth 


i 


- 


- 


j 


- 


1 


Out of State 


105 1 


„, 


3h 


U7 i 


io ! 


506 


TOTAL 


- 

26 3 l59 \ 


3,911 


3,2$k 


■ 

3,91*0 | 


5,383 j 


h2,6U7 



- 6 - 




^m 



HK£g 



m 



mm 






5*1**